4th INTERNATIONAL FAECAL SLUDGE MANAGEMENT CONFERENCE

The FSM4 Conference Committee has designed two field trips, which highlight the progress of waste treatment in India. Trip sizes are limited to enhance each participant’s personal learning experience. Please confirm your attendance for one of the two field trips on the conference registration form. Attendance will be confirmed on a first-come, first-served basis.

Field Trip 1 (fully booked)

Desludging + Co-treatment at Nesapakkan STP + Innovative technologies at Indian Institute of Technology (IIT) Madras

Desludging a septic tank followed by visit to Nesapakam Sewage Treatment Plant (STP) where co-treatment of faecal sludge treatment takes place. After the STP, participants will visit the IIT Madras campus where innovative technologies for on-site containment and treatment of faecal sludge are being tested.

This field trip comprises of getting an overview of the faecal sludge journey, the problems that most urban local bodies face while handling it and some possible options. Participants will observe the desludging process, how trucks are operated and managed, how and where faecal sludge is disposed, treated and made ready for reuse. Participants will also have the opportunity to speak with private and government players to understand how this process is managed. Nesapakkam Sewage Treatment Plant (capacity of 117 MLD) allows for faecal sludge (around 1.8 MLD) to be added to the sewage stream for co-treatment at the STP using an activated sludge process followed by anaerobic digestion and sludge thickening and drying. The dried treated sludge is then made available for reuse by farmers. The treated water is reused for gardening, and a plan is in the pipeline to send the treated water to industries for secondary usage. Biogas captured is used to generate electricity for usage at the facility.

After the Nesapakkam STP, participants will travel to the IIT Madras campus so see live demonstrations of innovative technologies like DRDO bio digester, Duke University bio digester, wetlands for treating greywater (horizontal, vertical and hybrid systems) and pilot scale septage management system.

Key Takeaways: Though the entire process of desludging and co-treatment works quite smoothly, it also has its share of problems. Discussions and inputs on what is the best way to handle faecal sludge? Should it be co-treated with sewage without prior solid/liquid separation? How to do STPs handle the excess treated sludge? What are the most suitable reuse options? What are the ways of managing a public private partnership like this? These questions will be addressed during the field visit and also during the following conference days. The IIT Madras units will provide participants a firsthand impression of how innovative technologies can be adopted to manage faecal sludge locally.

Duration of Field Trip 1:  

Total time – 4 hours and 30 minutes
Start Time: 9:00am, departing from ITC Grand Chola
Cost: $20 per person

 

Field Trip 2 (fully booked)

Desludging + Co-treatment at Perungudi STP + Community Biodigester at Tambaram

Desludging a septic tank followed by a visit to Perungudi Sewage Treatment Plant (STP) where co-treatment of faecal sludge treatment takes place. After the STP, participants will visit the community managed toilet complex with biodigester and community kitchen at Tambaram.

This field trip comprises of getting an overview of how faecal sludge is removed from household/institutional containment units, how private operators manage desludging, truck operations and treatment at a sewage treatment facility in the absence of a dedicated faecal sludge treatment plant in an urban scenario. Problems that most urban local bodies face while managing faecal sludge will also be discussed along with possible options. Participants will observe the desludging process, how trucks are operated and managed, how and where faecal sludge is disposed, treated and made ready for reuse. Perungudi STP allows for faecal sludge to be added to the sewage stream for co-treatment at the STP using an activated sludge process followed by anaerobic digestion and sludge thickening and drying. The dried treated sludge is then made available for reuse by farmers. The treated water is let out into the sea as there is currently no reuse option near the treatment facility. Biogas captured is used to generate electricity for usage at the facility. 

Post the STP, participants will visit an innovative public, private and people initiative where a toilet complex for slum dwellers has been built. The faecal sludge is collected in a biogas digester (15 cum/day capacity) and the biogas that is generated is used as fuel by the community in a community kitchen. The entire system is managed by the community, led by the women’s self-help group, with support from a private bank and the local municipality.

Key Takeaways: Though the entire process of desludging and co-treatment works quite smoothly, it also has its share of problems. Discussions and inputs on what is the best way to handle faecal sludge? Should it be co-treated with sewage without prior solid/liquid separation? How to do STPs handle the treated excess sludge? What are the most suitable reuse options? What are the ways of managing a public private partnership like this? These questions will be addressed during the field visit and also during the following conference days. The Tambaram Community Toilets with Community Kitchen is a successful example of solutions working at the local level that are beneficial to the community. The user fee collected from every household supports the management of the system.

Duration of Field Trip 2:

Total time – 5 hours
Start Time: 9:00am, departing from ITC Grand Chola
Cost: $20 per person

Convenors

  • _Asian Development Bank (ADB)
  • _Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation
  • _BORDA
  • _Consortium for DEWATS Dissemination Society
  • _Eawag-Sandec
  • _GIZ
  • _Indian Institute for Human Settlement
  • _Indian Institute of Technology Madras
  • _Ministry of Urban Development, Government of India
  • _Municipal Administration & Water Supply, Government of Tamil Nadu
  • _National Insitute of Urban Affairs
  • _Sustainable Sanitation Alliance (SuSanA)
  • _UNESCO-IHE
  • _University of KwaZulu-Natal
  • _Water Research Commission
  • _World Bank-WSP